Special Dish for the Week: Sentimental Osso Buco

The culinary weeks that turn into months of various bone broth soups continue chez Maggie—increasingly interspersed with green salads made with fresh produce from the downtown farmers market that has recently recommenced for the season—and this week include a very Special Dish for the Week as I think of my good friend in Brussels, whose dish this was a favourite when she introduced me to it while we studied together at UBC many moons ago:

Sentimental Osso Buco

Sentimental Osso Buco

Sentimental Osso Buco

This is the first time that I attempt this dish on my own, supported by the memories of my good friend from Brussels making it on occasion as a favoured of hers and by the slow cooker borrowed from my friendly neighbour next door.

The veal shank is an impulse buy at the first downtown farmers market of the season, now that I am trying some organic red meats again to help raise my chronically low iron levels, on the advice from my various medical and naturopathic doctors.

With the slow cooker in hand, the dish is relatively simple to make.

Osso Buco Ingredients

Osso Buco Ingredients

The ingredients include:

  • veal shank (containing the signature bone with a hole filled with marrow), lightly dusted with salt, pepper and flour, and seared in olive oil
  • coconut oil, for sautéeing the onions
  • onions, coarsely chopped
  • garlic, minced
  • red Thai chili pepper
  • carrots, diced
  • small shiitake mushrooms
  • 1 can diced tomatoes
  • 1 cup red wine
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • 1 tsp thyme powder
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 1 tsp Himalayan salt
  • cilantro, chopped and for garnish
Osso Buco Ready for Slow Cooking

Osso Buco Ready for Slow Cooking

Placing first the seasoned and seared veal shank at the bottom of the slow cooker, I layer on the veggies and spices, drowning them in tomatoes and red wine, to braise for several hours. The French have a much nicer and gentler sounding word—braiser (which translates to “braise” in English)—for the cooking process than the more humorously impassioned Polish—dusic (which translates literally to “choke” in English). The result of the slow cooking process is the same: most tender meat fibres that fall apart from merely being looked at.

Osso Buco Braised

Osso Buco Braised

The dish takes its time to mingle its flavours and soften its contents. I then let it rest over night to further deepen its taste.

The following day, I serve the reheated osso buco with a few steamed new potatoes, likewise acquired at the downtown farmers market.

The dish is accompanied by a French rosé wine as I share it with a friend at lunchtime.

Sentimental Osso Buco Dish

Sentimental Osso Buco Dish

All in all, the one veal shank gives six portions of osso buco, enjoyed over the course of the week, intensifying in its flavouring and memories of sharing the dish in the past with my good friend from Brussels. Santé ma chère amie, santé !!

Meal ideas & recipes from http://www.finecooking.com/recipes/osso-buco.aspx.

3 thoughts on “Special Dish for the Week: Sentimental Osso Buco

  1. yummie, just looking at the goregeous pictures of your Osso Buco I feel I can taste it…. mmmmM must make this recipe again dear friend 😉

Share your thoughts